'Give Kids a Smile Day' set for Feb. 3

The North Central Dental Society is gearing adult for a ninth annual “Give Kids a Smile Day!”

Feb. 3 is an American Dental Association nationally sponsored eventuality to provide children with unmet dental needs. At present, a area dentists listed next will report internal children for giveaway dental care, providing cleanings, fluoride treatments, verbal hygiene instructions and dental exams

Article source: http://www.southbendtribune.com/features/ourlives/sbt-give-kids-a-smile-day-set-for-feb-3-20120118,0,1569825.story?track=rss

Kids' dental health: tips for parents

tooth-taxi.JPGView full sizeDr. Weston Heringer Jr. not usually provides a dental caring though also drives a 38-foot outpost that serves as a Tooth Taxi, a mobile dental clinic, in 2008. National Children’s Dental Health Month doesn’t arrive until February, though it’s always a good time to examination your family’s dental hygiene practices to see if you’re doing all we can to keep your kids’ teeth and gums in a best probable condition.

Dr. Weston Heringer Jr.,

Article source: http://blog.oregonlive.com/themombeat/2012/01/kids_dental_health_tips_for_pa.html

1-800-DENTIST Warns Sugary Drinks Aren’t As Sweet As You Think

According to a U.S. Surgeon General, Tooth Decay is a Nation’s #1 Chronic Childhood Disease. Discover Five Healthy Beverages Kids Love to Help Fight Cavities.

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) Oct 11, 2010

School-aged children in a United States are confronting an widespread of tooth decay. The problem is so bad that a U.S. Surgeon General now recognizes tooth spoil as a nation’s series one ongoing childhood disease. A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) news indicates that a large partial of this problem is immature America’s unquenchable lust for rarely acidic, sugar-sweetened soft drinks, including sodas,

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/1-800-dentist-warns-sugary-drinks-aren-t.html

FOR KIDS: Dino teeth tell a roving tale

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Animals quit to survive. Golden eagles conduct south for a winter, salmon float upstream to lay eggs and locusts pierce on when it gets too crowded. Scientists now contend that 150 million years ago, plant-eating dinosaurs called sauropods vital in North America might have migrated, too. The new investigate suggests these huge animals trafficked during a change of a seasons, withdrawal dry riverbeds in hunt of well-watered areas thick with plants.

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Visit a new Science News for Kids website
 and review a rest of a full story: Dino teeth tell a roving tale

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  • Article source: http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/336208/title/FOR_KIDS_Dino_teeth_tell_a_traveling_tale

Dental hygiene students give good smiles

PEMBERTON TOWNSHIP — On Tuesday and Thursday afternoons and
Friday mornings, a lab during Burlington County College emits noises
not routinely listened in a honest halls of academia.

“We get buzzing,” pronounced Linda Hecker, executive of a college’s
dental hygiene program.

The 24 hearing chairs in a dental lab fill with county
residents who come to have their teeth cleaned, accept fluoride
treatments and get X-rays taken. All for $5 a visit.

Patients are referred to dentists for follow-up care. Many
revisit a lab for continued cleanings — brightening their smiles
while preventing tooth decay.

More than 4,000 people have taken advantage of the

Article source: http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/burlington_county_times_news/dental-hygiene-students-give-great-smiles/article_dd4ed48d-e504-5270-86c6-f4de67dc7d83.html

Aggressive children could have worse health as adults

Kids who uncover charge could have worse health as adults, a investigate finds.

Lifestyle choices — what we eat, how most we practice — might not be a usually forecaster of health after in life. A investigate in a Canadian Medical Assn. Journal finds that function in childhood, such as charge and amicable withdrawal, could envision some-more sickness

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-childhood-aggression-health-20111114,0,4157506.story?track=rss

Dental hygiene students give great smiles

PEMBERTON TOWNSHIP — On Tuesday and Thursday afternoons and
Friday mornings, a lab at Burlington County College emits noises
not normally heard in the solemn halls of academia.

“We get buzzing,” said Linda Hecker, director of the college’s
dental hygiene program.

The 24 examination chairs in the dental lab fill with county
residents who come to have their teeth cleaned, receive fluoride
treatments and get X-rays taken. All for $5 a visit.

Patients are referred to dentists for follow-up care. Many
revisit the lab for continued cleanings — brightening their smiles
while preventing tooth decay.

More than 4,000 people have taken advantage of the discounted
dental care in the six years since the college initiated the
program.

Sandy Hammel of Westampton heard about it at her doctor’s office
two years ago when she was out of work. She called, made an
appointment, and has been coming to the college to have her teeth
cleaned ever since.

“In these economic times, who could pass that up?” Hammel said.
“When I left here, my mouth was clean.”

The students’ professionalism and personal care impressed
Hammel.

Hecker said the students take their time with the dental exams
and cleanings, as they are learning the procedures and must show
their skills to their instructors.

They practice first on adjustable dummy heads with teeth called
typodonts. Then they clean one another’s teeth before taking on
paying patients.

The patients receive an initial exam to determine what work they
will require. Those with the most serious issues are assigned to
the second-year students.

Since only six county colleges in New Jersey offer a dental
hygiene course, the 24 slots in the two-year program fill
quickly.

“I love it,” said Maria Pilch of Medford Lakes.

Pilch started college in Maryland before transferring to BCC.
She knew she wanted to be a hygienist.

“Being in the program reinforced it’s what I want to do,” she
said as she worked on molding an athletic mouth guard.

Students learn many skills: performing oral exams, cleaning and
bleaching teeth, installing temporary fillings, making and
installing temporary crowns, sterilizing equipment, and taking and
processing X-rays.

Since X-rays can be forwarded to a dentist by email, the
students learn both a new digital process and how to develop film
in a darkroom.

Students also must take several academic courses for a total of
34 credits, including microbiology, chemistry, and anatomy and
physiology. Most take the classes as prerequisites, attending the
college for at least a year before applying for the program.

“It would be highly unusual for someone straight out of high
school to be accepted,” Hecker said.

Dayna Tims of Maple Shade, who cleaned Hammel’s teeth, and
fellow student Anthony Tanasy of Lakewood, Ocean County, both
worked as dental assistants before applying to BCC for the hygiene
program.

“It definitely broadens my horizons,” Tanasy said.

While students from other counties apply, first preference goes
to those from Burlington County. Applications are accepted starting
Sept. 1 for the following fall’s classes.

Dental appointments are filled for the fall, but in the spring
semester, students will be seeing patients every weekday.

On Feb. 3, the school also offers a free clinic for children
called “Give Kids a Smile Day.” It’s for children 12 and younger
whose families do not have dental insurance. Each year, more than
150 children participate, receiving more than $85,000 in dental
care, Hecker said.

Dentists volunteer to do filings and provide other services for
the children, assisted by the dental hygiene students. Many
graduated students return to help out as well.

“I love that they love the day as much as they do,” Hecker
said.

To make an appointment at the dental clinic, call 609-894-9311,
ext. 1074.

Peg Quann: 609-871-8057;

email: pquann@phillyBurbs.com;

Twitter: @pequann

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